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WELCOME TO THE

EEC GROUP

 

OVERVIEW

 
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WHAT WE DO

The experimental ecology & conservation group focusses on synthesising information from mathematical models, small-scale experimental systems, and long-term wild population data to learn more about the world around us, and in particular help make decisions about how to best preserve biodiversity into the future.

NOVEL TECHNIQUES

A specific focus is on developing new, exciting, and useful techniques to make the experimental systems we work with more realistic reflections of the world around us.

ITS ALL ABOUT THE BIG PICTURE

But our focus is always on how we can learn more about the natural world without having to carry out invasive or damaging experiments in the field.

 

NEWS

The latest news on papers, grants, and members joining the group!

For regular news updates follow us on twitter

NEW GROUP MEMBER - DR FRANCESCO CERINI

March, 2021

We have welcomed a new group member - Dr Francesco Cerini. Francesco will be working on early warning signals of collapse in spatially complex systems, and is funded by a NERC standard grant.

DATA PUBLISHING

October, 2020

In line with the principals of open science and data sharing we are striving to make all the data that our lab group generates available via a github repository. This will take some time, but all data going forward will be uploaded to that site, and data from previous experiments (be that laboratory generated or simulation generated) will be made available as soon as possible. 

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PROJECTS

 
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EARLY WARNING SIGNALS

Predicting the fate of biological systems is critical in the light of continued global change, especially in the field of conservation biology where at risk populations must be prioritised to make the most of limited resources. A long running interest of this group is developing warning signals of approach population, community, and ecosystem collapse based on temporal patterns in abundance, trait, and spatial data.

EXPERIMENTALLY TESTING CONSERVATION THEORY

Designing optimal conservation strategies is key in the face of limited funding and ever increasing anthropogenic stresses. A central theme to the group is using experimental systems to test and develop conservation theory.

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MANAGED RELOCATIONS

As climate changes species are increasingly at risk of extinction as they fail to move fast enough to stay within their ecological niche. One radical option is to relocate them outside of their historic range to ensure their medium to long term survival. We are interested in how and when such moves should be undertaken, and how a move will affect the resident communities.

THE EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE STRESSORS

The effects of multiple stressors (e.g. including habitat loss, pollution, over harvesting, climatic change, and the introduction of invasive species) on global biodiversity is a continued concern. We are interested in the possible interactive effects of these stressors, and how this may affect populations and communities.

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RESILIENCE AND RECOVERY IN FISHERIES

Fisheries are one of the most economic and ecologically important ecosystems on earth. However the vast majority are in a state of significant degradation. We are interested in how such systems might recovery, and the pathways they might take doing so, and how these pathways affect community structure and function.

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PEOPLE

 
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DR CHRIS CLEMENTS

Group leader

My interests centre on the extinction of species and collapse of populations, topics which I investigate using a combination of mathematical models, microcosm experiments, and analysis of real world population data.

My current interests are on resilience loss and the conservation of species in the face of multiple stressors.

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DR POL CAPDEVILA

Post doctoral researcher

My current position in Bristol is aimed to assess the impacts of multiple stressors on biodiversity and the loss of resilience on a global scale. Generally, my work aims to better understand the life history of species, to predict their response to disturbances, and to use that information to develop effective management and conservation tools. To do that I combine the use of small-scale experiments, field data, large-scale data, together with a wide variety of modelling techniques, to better understand, predict and manage species dynamics.


Google Scholar 

DR MARC BESSON

Post doctoral researcher

I am a Research Associate at the University of Bristol, where my research aims to assess the impacts of multiple stressors on resilience loss in laboratory systems, using gantries, AI and experimental arenas. Overall, I am interested in the effects of stressors on aquatic organisms and how they can affect key ecological processes during critical life-history transitions. I like to use integrative approaches, from the molecule to the behavior, to investigate the inner mechanisms that could explain such affected ecological processes.

Google Scholar 

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DR FRANCESCO CERINI

Post doctoral researcher

My research interests are broad, but mainly revolving around abiotic factors and biotic interactions as structuring forces of species occurrence, distribution and abundance in ecosystems. Also, I am interested in studying the effects of human influence (e.g., habitat and climate modification, pollution, overharvesting) on ecosystem patterns and processes in a conservation framework. I both use local fieldwork data, macroecological approaches and experimental systems to test community assembly processes.


Google scholar 

DONGBO LI

PhD student (University of Bristol)

I am studying the efficiency of wildlife corridors in theory and in practice. I am interested the role of corridors in determining the population growth and stability in microcosm networks and under field conditions, testing whether changing the quality and quantity of corridors can influence population dispersal ability and enhance ecosystem functions. My research would have a better understanding of the importance of wildlife corridors in fragmented habitats.

Co-supervised with Prof. Jane Memmott.

DUNCAN O'BRIEN

PhD Student (University of Bristol)

My MSc at the University of Essex has led to research interests involving the feedbacks of evolution and environment in shaping ecosystems and its management implications. I am a PhD student at the University of Bristol, exploring the use of early warning signals in predicting aquatic regime shifts via ecological modelling and analysis of long term data sets.

Google Scholar

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ELLIE WOLFE

Technician

My research interests focus on the importance of land management practices for species conservation on a multi-species level. My current work uses microcosm experiments to investigate the SLOSS debate, in particular whether species dispersal between patches affects what the best land-management practice is, and how our inability to detect species in heterogeneous environments might alter our decision-making process.

ALUMNI

 
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NICOLA NOVIELLO

Mres

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GAURAV BARUAH

PhD student

Google Scholar

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NATHAN WILLIAMS

 

PUBLICATIONS

 

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

THESES

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DATA

In line with the principals of open science and data sharing we are striving to make all the data that our lab group generates available via a github repository. This will take some time, but all data going forward will be uploaded to that site, and data from previous experiments (be that laboratory generated or simulation generated) will be made available as soon as possible.

 

JOIN THE GROUP

We are always looking for enthusiastic members to join the group, from masters students to post docs. Funding for these are available through a number of channels, depending on the career stage.

Please feel free to contact me any time to discuss the possibility of apply for one of these schemes and joining our team.

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AVAILABLE POSITIONS 

Adverts for funded positions will appear below

NONE AT PRESENT

 

CONTACT US

School of Biological Sciences
University of Bristol
Bristol Life Sciences Building
24 Tyndall Avenue
Bristol

England
BS8 1TQ

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